Holiday Season Celebration Reminder To Manage Intoxication Risks

December 29, 2010

With New Years Eve celebrations approaching and the Holiday Season wrapping up, businesses should take some common sense steps to minimize the risk of waking up in 2011 with a liability hangover.  Participation of employees and clients in company sponsored and other social celebrations and activities can promote big rewards in relationship development and morale if properly managed.  However, traditional holiday toasts and the wide-spread consumption of other intoxicating substances commonly included at New Years Eve and other parties and social activities create heightened risks for business whether or not the event is company-sponsored.  However these risks continue and require management all year.  Read about other common Holiday Season-related celebration risks and management tips here.

Most businesses recognize that accidents caused by alcohol or other intoxication at work or work-related functions can create substantial liability exposures both to workers and any third parties injured by a drunken employee.  In many states, businesses also may face “dram shop” or other claims if employees, family members or other guests attending company sponsored functions injure others after over-imbibing.  Risks are heightened when an employee consuming alcohol at a company or client-related social function drives a company or his own automobile when under the influence of drugs or alcohol. 

Businesses concerned with these liability exposures should take steps to manage the potential risks that commonly arise when employees, clients or other guests consume alcohol at company sponsored events or while attending other business associated festivities.

Whether concerned with intoxication in the workplace, at work-related events or at off-duty social activities, the obvious starting point is to review existing drug and alcohol and related background investigation, drug and alcohol testing, privacy, off-duty conduct and related policies and procedures.  In addition to ensuring these policies are appropriately tailored to meet existing legal requirements, businesses also should consider whether these policies should be revised to reach business-relevant off-duty conduct and locations. 

To minimize these risks at company-sponsored events, many companies elect not to serve or limit the alcohol served to guests at company sponsored events.  To support the effectiveness of these efforts, many businesses also choose to prohibit or restrict the consumption of guest provided alcohol at company events.

Businesses that elect to serve alcohol at company functions or anticipate that employees will attend other business functions where alcohol will be served need to consider the potential liability risks that may result if the alcohol impaired judgment of an employee or other guest causes him to injure himself or someone else.  The relaxation of judgment that often results from the consumption of alcohol or other intoxicants also heightens sexual harassment and other discrimination risks.  Any company that expects that an employee might consume alcohol at a company sponsored or other business associated event should communicate clearly its expectation that employees not over-imbibe and abstain from driving under the influence.  Where off-duty socialization among employees is anticipated in light of company culture, similar reminders concerning off-duty conduct having implications on company policy or reputation also often are in order.  Many businesses also find it beneficial to redistribute information about employee assistance programs (EAPs) along with this information.  You can find other tips for planning workplace parties to minimize alcohol related risks on the U.S. Department of Labor’s website here.

When addressing business related alcohol consumption, many businesses will want to consider not only alcohol consumption at business related events as well as potential costs that may arise from off-duty excess alcohol consumption. Whether resulting from on or off duty consumption, businesses are likely to incur significant health and disability related benefit costs if an employee is injured in an alcohol-related accident.  Furthermore, even when no injury results, productivity losses attributable to excess alcohol consumption, whether on or off duty, can prove expensive to business.  Accordingly, virtually all businesses can benefit from encouraging employees to be responsible when consuming alcohol in both business and non-business functions.

Businesses also may want to review their existing health and other benefit programs, liability insurance coverage and employment policies to determine to ensure that they adequately protect and promote the company’s risk management objectives.  Many health and disability plans incorporate special provisions affecting injuries arising from inappropriate alcohol use as well as mental health and alcohol and drug treatment programs.  Similarly, many businesses increasingly qualify for special discounts on automobile and general liability policies based upon representations that the business has in effect certain alcohol and drug use policies.  Businesses can experience unfortunate surprises if they don’t anticipate the implications of these provisions on their health benefit programs or liability insurance coverage. Reviewing these policies now to become familiar with any of these requirements and conditions also can be invaluable in helping a business to respond effectively if an employee or guest is injured in an alcohol-related accident during the Holiday Season.

Businesses also should consider reviewing their policy on the duty of an employee or contractor to notify the company of accidents, moving violations and driving while intoxicated or other criminal charges resulting from the consumption of drugs or alcohol.  Requiring notification of traffic related charges and accidents can help management prepare to defend against potential liability exposures that may arise from an accident or other incident. Where a worker suffers an injury, notification may be essential to enable the business to provide required notification to worker’s compensation carriers and regulators, conduct timely investigations, and meet other critical responsibilities.  In addition, driving under the influence or other criminal charges may impact company liability insurance risks, signal possible vicarious liability or other suits.  To help facilitate the ability to adequately investigate these concerns, businesses also should review and update privacy, background check and other investigations and other related policies to ensure that they are legally compliant and are sufficiently broad to reach to relevant off-duty or off-site conduct.

Businesses also should make advance arrangements to minimize foreseeable safety risks from intoxication at social or other events.  When in doubt, company policy and practice should be to regulate consumption to safe levels, to require the arrangement of safe alternative transportation of any employee or guest at risk of intoxication, and to provide other safeguards to minimize the risk of injury to workers or others. The cost of arranging a taxi ride home quickly pales when compared to the significant legal costs that can result if an accident results. 

Businesses faced with suspicions or allegations of intoxication or other misconduct also should act promptly to investigate any concerns and if necessary, take appropriate corrective action.  Delay in investigation can undermine the reliability and effectiveness of investigation efforts.  Delay also can increase the liability exposure of a business presented with a valid complaint and complicate the ability to defend charges that may arise against the business.  Additionally, delay also increases the likelihood that a complaining party will seek the assistance of governmental officials, plaintiff’s lawyers or others outside the corporation in the redress of his concern.

If a report of an accident, or other liability related event arises, remember to consider as part of your response whether you need to report the event to any insurers or agencies.  Injuries occurring at company related functions often qualify as occupational injuries subject to worker’s compensation and occupational safety laws.  Likewise, automobile, employment practices liability, and general liability policies often require covered parties to notify the carrier promptly upon receipt of notice of an event or claim that may give rise to coverage, even though the carrier at that time may not be obligated to tender a defense or coverage at that time.

Finally, businesses should keep in mind that the risks highlighted by Holiday Season celebrations continue to exist whenever employees, contractors or others consume alcohol or other intoxicants at social or other events throughout the year.  Sporting events, marketing dinners and happy hours and other social gatherings that commonly occur during the year commonly create similar risks while engendering less attention.  Accordingly, businesses should remind employees periodically throughout the year about substance abuse, intoxication and other similar policies throughout the year.

For Help With Investigations, Policy Updates Or Other Needs

If your organization needs assistance investigating a reported concern, reviewing and updating its policies or assessing, managing or defending these or other labor and employment, compensation or benefit practices,  or needs other assistance auditing, updating or defending its human resources, corporate ethics, and compliance practices, or responding to employment related or other charges or suits, please contact management attorney and consultant Cynthia Marcotte Stamer at cstamer@solutionslawyer.net, (468) 767-8872.

Board Certified in Labor & Employment Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and Chair of the American Bar Association RPTE Employee Benefits & Other Compensation Group and a nationally recognized author and speaker, Ms. Stamer helps business manage people, operations and risk.  She is experienced with advising and assisting employers with these and other labor and employment, employee benefit, compensation, risk management and internal controls matters. Her experience includes helping management both manage performance and manage legal risk and compliance.  While helping businesses define and manage the conduct and performance of their employees, contractors and vendors, she also assists employers and others about compliance with federal and state equal employment opportunity, compensation, health and other employee benefit, workplace safety, and other labor and employment laws, advises and defends businesses against labor and employment, employee benefit, compensation, fraud and other regulatory compliance and other related audits, investigations and litigation, charges, audits, claims and investigations by the IRS, Department of Labor, Department of Justice, SEC,  Federal Trade Commission, HUD, HHS, DOD, Departments of Insurance, and other federal and state regulators. She has counseled and represented businesses and their management on workforce and other internal controls and risk management matters for more than 23 years. Ms. Stamer also speaks and writes extensively on these and other related matters. For additional information about Ms. Stamer and her experience or to access other publications by Ms. Stamer see here or contact Ms. Stamer directly.

Other Helpful Resources & Information

If you found this article of interest, you also may be interested in reviewing other Breaking News, articles and other resources available CynthiaStamer.com or Solutions Law Press articles authored by Ms. Stamer including:

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail – by creating or updating your profile here. For important information concerning this communication click here.  If you do not wish to receive these updates in the future, unsubscribe by updating your profile here.

About Solutions Law Press

Solutions Law Press™ provides business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other resources, training and education on human resources, employee benefits, compensation, data security and privacy, health care, insurance, and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and other key operational concerns. If you find this of interest, you also be interested reviewing some of our other Solutions Law Press resources available for review here.

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail – by creating or updating your profile here. For important information concerning this communication click here. 

 ©2010 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, P.C. Limited right to republish granted to Solutions Law Press.   All other  rights reserved.


Avoiding Post-Holiday Celebration Sexual Harassment & Discrimination Liability

December 29, 2010

With New Years Eve celebrations approaching and the Holiday Season wrapping up, businesses should take some common sense steps to decrease the risk of waking up in 2011 with a liability hangover.  Participation of employees and clients in company sponsored and other social celebrations and activities can promote big rewards in relationship development and morale if properly managed.  However, the music, food, game playing, toasting with alcohol and other aspects of the celebratory atmosphere at New Years Eve and other parties and social activities heighten the risk that certain employees or other business associates will engage in, or be subject to, risky or other inappropriate behavior that can create liability exposures or other business concerns for your business whether or not company sponsored.   Read about other common Holiday Season-related celebration risks and management tips here.

Celebrations Raise Foreseeable Risks

Whether or not company-sponsored, holiday parties and other celebrations where employees celebrate with other employees or clients tend to fuel bad behavior by inviting fraternization, lowering inhibitions and obscuring the line between appropriate and inappropriate social and business behavior.  The relaxation of the environment heightens the risk that certain employees or clients will make unwelcome sexual advances, make sexually suggestive or other inappropriate statements, or engage in other actions that expose the business to sexual harassment or other employment discrimination liability. Businesses also should use care to manage other discrimination exposures in the planning of holiday festivities, gift exchanges, and other activities. Businesses also should be vigilant in watching for signs of inappropriate patterns of discrimination in the selection of employees invited to participate in company-connected social events as well as off-duty holiday gatherings sponsored by managers and supervisors. In addition, businesses also should critically review their own plans for possible insensitivity. Business connected holiday parties, communications, gifts and other festivities should be designed to show appropriate sensitivity to religious and other cultural diversity.

To minimize these exposures, businesses should take steps to communicate and reinforce company policies and expectations about sexual harassment, discrimination, fraternization and other conduct viewed as inappropriate by the company and communicating reminders about these policies to employees and business associates during the Holiday Season. 

Timely Investigation & Notification

Businesses faced with allegations of discrimination, sexual harassment or other misconduct also should act promptly to investigate any concerns and if necessary, take timely corrective action.  Delay in investigation or redress of discrimination or other improprieties can increase the liability exposure of a business presented with a valid complaint and complicate the ability to defend charges that may arise against the business.  Additionally, delay also increases the likelihood that a complaining party will contact governmental officials, plaintiff’s lawyers or others outside the corporation in the redress of his concern.

If a report of an accident, act of discrimination or sexual harassment or other liability related event arises, remember to consider as part of your response whether you need to report the event to any insurers or agencies.  Injuries occurring at company related functions often qualify as occupational injuries subject to worker’s compensation and occupational safety laws.  Likewise, automobile, employment practices liability, and general liability policies often require covered parties to tell the carrier promptly upon receipt of notice of an event or claim that may give rise to coverage, even though the carrier may not be obligated to tender a defense or coverage at that time.

For Help With Investigations, Policy Updates Or Other Needs

If your organization needs help investigating a reported concern, reviewing and updating its policies or assessing, managing or defending these or other labor and employment, compensation or benefit practices,  or needs other assistance auditing, updating or defending its human resources, corporate ethics, and compliance practices, or responding to employment related or other charges or suits, please contact management attorney and consultant Cynthia Marcotte Stamer at cstamer@solutionslawyer.net, (468) 767-8872.

Board Certified in Labor & Employment Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and Chair of the American Bar Association RPTE Employee Benefits & Other Compensation Group and a nationally recognized author and speaker, Ms. Stamer helps business manage people, operations and risk.  She is experienced with advising and assisting employers with these and other labor and employment, employee benefit, compensation, risk management and internal controls matters. Her experience includes helping management both manage performance and manage legal risk and compliance.  While helping businesses define and manage the conduct and performance of their employees, contractors and vendors, she also assists employers and others about compliance with federal and state equal employment opportunity, compensation, health and other employee benefit, workplace safety, and other labor and employment laws, advises and defends businesses against labor and employment, employee benefit, compensation, fraud and other regulatory compliance and other related audits, investigations and litigation, charges, audits, claims and investigations by the IRS, Department of Labor, Department of Justice, SEC,  Federal Trade Commission, HUD, HHS, DOD, Departments of Insurance, and other federal and state regulators. She has counseled and represented businesses and their management on workforce and other internal controls and risk management matters for more than 23 years. Ms. Stamer also speaks and writes extensively on these and other related matters. For additional information about Ms. Stamer and her experience or to get access to other publications by Ms. Stamer see here or contact Ms. Stamer directly.

Other Helpful Resources & Information

If you found this article of interest, you also may be interested in reviewing other Breaking News, articles and other resources available CynthiaStamer.com or Solutions Law Press articles authored by Ms. Stamer including:

About Solutions Law Press

Solutions Law Press™ provides business risk management, legal compliance, management effectiveness and other resources, training and education on human resources, employee benefits, compensation, data security and privacy, health care, insurance, and other key compliance, risk management, internal controls and other key operational concerns. If you find this of interest, you also be interested reviewing some of our other Solutions Law Press resources available for review here.

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates about developments on these and other concerns, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail – by creating or updating your profile here. For important information concerning this communication click here.  If you do not wish to receive these updates in the future, unsubscribe by updating your profile here.

©2010 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer, P.C.  Non-exclusive right to republish granted to Solutions Law Press.  All other rights reserved.


Small Employers Should Weigh If Health Premium Tax Credit Justifies Changing Employee Leasing Arrangements

December 5, 2010

Accessing more affordable health care coverage often is a major driver behind the decision of many small businesses to enter into employee leasing arrangements.  Many of these small businesses should consider if changing existing employee leasing practices makes sense to avoid unknowingly forfeiting or otherwise qualify to claim valuable health insurance premium tax credits  under new Internal Revenue Code (Code) § 45R.

Enacted as part of the sweeping health care reforms included in the  Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (Affordable Care Act), Code § 45R generally offers a small employer that meets Code § 45R’s conditions (qualifying employer) to claim a tax credit for premiums that it pays for health insurance coverage to employees if:

  • The employer had fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees (“FTEs”) for the tax year;
  • The average annual wages of its employees for the year must be less than $50,000 per FTE; and
  • The employer pays premiums to provide employee health care coverage under a “qualifying arrangement.”

For purposes of Code § 45R, “qualifying arrangement” is an arrangement under which an qualifying employer pays premiums for each employee enrolled in health insurance coverage offered by the employer in an amount equal to a uniform percentage (not less than 50 percent) of the premium cost of the coverage.

An analysis of an advance copy of Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Notice 2010-82, scheduled for official publication on December 20, 2010, reveals that a small business that leases rather than employs directly workers gives up the ability to claim a Code § 45R tax credit for amounts paid toward health insurance premiums charged for leased employees when the leasing organization employs the worker even though the business could have claimed those amounts if it employed the worker and paid the premiums directly.  

According to Notice 2010-82, leased employees as defined in Code § 414(n) are counted in computing FTEs and average annual wages of businesses leasing their services (Service Recipient).  This means that that the use of leased employees will disqualify the business for the Code § 45R tax credit if its total workforce exceeds 25 FTEs when leased employees are taken into account.

Although Service Recipients must count these leased employees when calculating FTEs, and compensation for purposes of determining if the business is a qualified employer, the IRS says Code § 45R does not allow a Service Recipient to claim the Code §45R credit for health insurance premiums paid by or through a leasing organization for coverage of leased employees.  Since leasing organizations usually employ more than 25 FTEs, this means that neither business can claim any credit.

While the IRS won’t let Service Recipients claim credit for health premiums paid by a leasing company, Notice 2010-82 suggests that an otherwise qualifying small business can claim the tax credit for health premiums accessed through a leasing organization or other arrangement when the Service Recipient, and not the leasing organization, employs the workers and pays health premiums for coverage for the worker.  Assuming a business otherwise is a qualifying employer, Notice 2010-82 suggests that the business may claim the tax credit for premiums it pays to purchases qualifying health insurance for individuals employed as the common law employee of the business directly to a licensed insurer or to obtain insured coverage from a multiemployer plan that otherwise meets the requirements of Code § 45R. 

As with any decision about the use of leased employees, the feasibility and potential costs and benefits of structuring or restructuring the relationship with a worker who otherwise would be leased through a staffing company to claim the Code § 45R tax credit needs to be carefully evaluated before a business acts.  Businesses should carefully evaluate both the change in insurance costs, if any, and how the structuring of the relationship will affect other costs and liabilities.  Changing the relationship with a worker from employee to leased employee or visa versa can impact unemployment, employee benefit, employment liability, contractual, tort and other costs, obligations and other responsibilities.  In some instances, increased health insurance or other costs and liabilities may outweigh the tax benefits that a small business otherwise could get by qualifying for the Code § 45R tax credit.  Where the existing or contemplated relationship between business and the leasing organization already creates a co-employment relationship for many legal or financial purposes, however, restructuring the relationship to allow the business to directly employ workers but continue to use the payroll services of and access health coverage and other benefits for the worker under multiple employer benefit plans sponsored by the leasing organization may prove a viable and attractive option.  Moreover, as many businesses misunderstand legal risks and benefits of their employee leasing and other contingent workforce relationships, businesses should consult with competent legal counsel within the scope of attorney-client privilege to ensure that they have an accurate understanding of the legal implications of their existing employee leasing arrangements when evaluating these potential costs and benefits to avoid making misinformed decisions. 

Employers Urged To Seek Advice To Determine Tax Eligibility, Manage Legal Risks

Given the high cost of health insurance coverage, the Code § 45R credit may offers valuable savings for qualifying small employer.  Before providing coverage or estimating tax liabilities in reliance on the expectation of claiming the credit, however, an employer interested in claiming the credit should seek guidance from qualified tax counsel familiar with the Code § 45R rules and guidance as well as other applicable federal mandates impacting employer provided coverage.  The clarifications set forth in Notice 2010-82 illustrate that the rules for determining if an employer qualifies to claim a tax credit for health insurance premiums paid for employees under Code § 45R are anything but simple. In addition to meeting these conditions, employers offering or contributing to health coverage for employees can face a broad range of other legal and financial risk if they fail to properly understand and manage the organizational and personal responsibilities that can arise under applicable federal laws.  Where it is contemplated that health coverage will be accessed or provided through an employee leasing, staffing or multiple employee plan arrangement, other additional considerations also will apply.  Accordingly, small and other businesses that provide health coverage to employees or paying to lease the services of workers from a leasing organization that provides health coverage should review their options with experienced legal counsel within the scope of attorney-client privilege.

For More Information Or Assistance

You can learn more about these and other federal health plan mandates by listening to the recording of the 2010 Health Plan Update Briefing or reviewing other resources available here.  If you need help with these or other employee benefit, compensation or employment regulations or other related matters please contact Cynthia Marcotte Stamer here or (469)767-8872. 

Management attorney and consultant Cynthia Marcotte Stamer has more than 23 years experience advising and representing employers, employee benefit plans, their sponsors, fiduciaries, plan administrators, service providers, consultants, vendors, outsourcers, insurers, financial services providers, governments and others about health and other employee benefit, compensation, employment, insurance and financial services, and a wide range of other performance, legal and operational risk management practices and concerns.  Board Certified in Labor and Employment Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, Chair of the American Bar Association (ABA) RPTE Employee Benefit & Other Compensation Group, a Council Member of the ABA Joint Committee on Employee Benefits, and Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Interest Group, Ms. Stamer is nationally recognized for her work helping clients to design, document, administer and defend health and other employee benefit plans and other related financial and insurance products and to manage risks associated with the offering and administration of these arrangements.  Her experience includes extensive work advising and representing employers, plans, plan fiduciaries, trustees, investors, and others about managing and resolving risks relating to fiduciary, contracting and other risks and responsibilities involved in the design, selection and administration of investments for employee benefit plans, and other fiduciary responsibility matters.  She also has extensive experience assisting these and other clients to investigate and determine the appropriateness of retirement plan investment selections to comply with ERISA and other fiduciary responsibility rules, as well as to defend challenges to investment offerings or decisions against complaints or actions brought by private plaintiffs, the Labor Department, state and federal securities regulators, insurers and others.  A prolific author and popular speaker, Ms. Stamer also publishes, conducts client and other training, speaks and consults extensively on employee benefit, compensation and human resources practices and concerns for the ABA, World At Work, SHRM, American Health Lawyers Association, Institute of Internal Auditors, Society for Professional Benefits Administrators, HCCA, Southwest Benefits Association and many other organizations.  Her insights on these and related topics have appeared in Atlantic Information Service, Bureau of National Affairs, World At Work, The Wall Street Journal, Business Insurance, Managed Healthcare, Health Leaders, various ABA publications and a many other national and local publications. To learn more about Ms. Stamer, her experience, involvements, programs and publications, see here or contact Ms. Stamer.

Other Resources & Developments

If you found this information of interest, you also may be interested in reviewing other recent updates by Ms. Stamer about the tax credit on Code §45R or other benefits, compensation or human resources matters including:

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates and notices about upcoming programs and events, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail- by creating or updating your profile at here.  To unsubscribe, send an e-mail with “Unsubscribe” in the subject here.  For important information concerning this communication click here.

THE FOLLOWING DISCLAIMER IS INCLUDED TO COMPLY WITH AND IN RESPONSE TO U.S. TREASURY DEPARTMENT CIRCULAR 230 REGULATIONS.  ANY STATEMENTS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE NOT INTENDED OR WRITTEN BY THE WRITER TO BE USED, AND NOTHING CONTAINED HEREIN CAN BE USED BY YOU OR ANY OTHER PERSON, FOR THE PURPOSE OF (1) AVOIDING PENALTIES THAT MAY BE IMPOSED UNDER FEDERAL TAX LAW, OR (2) PROMOTING, MARKETING OR RECOMMENDING TO ANOTHER PARTY ANY TAX-RELATED TRANSACTION OR MATTER ADDRESSED HEREIN.

©2010 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer. Limited non-exclusive license to republish granted to Solutions Law Press.  All other rights reserved.


2011 Standard Mileage Rates Announced

December 5, 2010

 The Internal Revenue Service on December 3, 2010 published the 2011 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes in Revenue Procedure 2010-51 for 2011.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2011, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 51 cents per mile for business miles driven
  • 19 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle. In addition, the business standard mileage rate cannot be used for any vehicle used for hire or for more than four vehicles used simultaneously.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

Revenue Procedure 2010-51 contains additional details regarding the standard mileage rates.

 For More Information Or Assistance

If you need help updating your organization’s mileage reimbursement policy or other employee benefit, compensation or employment regulations or other related matters please contact Cynthia Marcotte Stamer here or (469)767-8872. 

About Ms. Stamer

Board Certified in Labor and Employment Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, Chair of the American Bar Association (ABA) RPTE Employee Benefit & Other Compensation Group, a Council Member of the ABA Joint Committee on Employee Benefits, Past Chair of the ABA Health Law Section Managed Care & Insurance Interest Group, management attorney and consultant Cynthia Marcotte Stamer has more than 23 years experience advising and representing employers, health and other employee benefit plans, their sponsors, fiduciaries and plan administrators, consultants, vendors, outsourcers, insurers, governments and others about employment, employee benefit, compensation, and a wide range of other performance, legal and operational risk management practices and concerns.  As a part of this work, Ms. Stamer has worked extensively with clients to manage risks and defend practices under a wide range of laws and circumstances.  Her experience includes extensive work advising and representing employers, plans, plan fiduciaries, trustees, investors, and others about managing and resolving risks relating to distressed pension and other employee benefit plans, downsizing and other workforce reengineering and other similar matters.  A prolific author and popular speaker, Ms. Stamer also publishes, conducts client and other training, speaks and consults extensively on GINA and other employment and employee benefit risk management practices and concerns for the ABA, World At Work, SHRM, American Health Lawyers Association, Institute of Internal Auditors, Society for Professional Benefits Administrators, HCCA, Southwest Benefits Association and many other organizations.  Her insights on these and related topics have appeared in Atlantic Information Service, Bureau of National Affairs, World At Work, The Wall Street Journal, Business Insurance, Managed Healthcare, Health Leaders, various ABA publications and a many other national and local publications. To learn more about Ms. Stamer, her experience, involvements, programs and publications, see here or contact Ms. Stamer.

Other Resources & Developments

If you found this information of interest, you also may be interested in reviewing other recent Solutions Law Press updates including:

If you or someone else you know would like to receive future updates and notices about upcoming programs and events, please be sure that we have your current contact information – including your preferred e-mail- by creating or updating your profile at here.  To unsubscribe, send an e-mail with “Unsubscribe” in the subject here.  For important information concerning this communication click here.

©2010 Cynthia Marcotte Stamer. All rights reserved.


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